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Many times the questions you want most answered are never addressed. With the help of our chief resident, Dr Natalie Zaharoff, we present the most frequently asked (and not asked but important) questions. If these FAQ's are not enough, we invite you to contact us with the contact link for a more personal answer.  
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FAQ

1.  How is the KRMC unique amongst other emergency medicine residencies?
2.  Is this program accredited?
3.  Is this a 3 or 4 year program?
4.  What is the emergency department like at KRMC?
5.  What kind of attending coverage can be expected at KRMC?
6.  What do the different hospitals have to offer?
7.  How much time in the residency is devoted to the emergency department?
8.  Are there teaching opportunities for the residents?
9.  How much responsibility do residents have?
10.  What are the specific roles of the different classes of residents?
11.  What formal didactics are offered?
12.  Are the residents relieved of their clinical duties to attend the didactic   conferences?
13.  What research opportunities are available?
14.  How are the residents evaluated? How often?
15.  Do the residents get to evaluate the faculty and rotations?
16.  What does Kingman have to offer?
17.  Do you get a chance to see the rest of Arizona?
18.  How is the Residency Program governed?  
19.  Who would do well at the KRMC?
20.  How are applicants selected?
21.  Does the date that I interview affect my position on the residency's Rank Order List? Should I plan to interview only in January, for example?
22.  Have there been any recent changes in the program? 

23.   What is the future of the KRMC Residency in Emergency Medicine?

24.   Where should I write to request a brochure or additional information?
25.   Do you accept USMLE scores?

26.   Do you have a resident mentoring program?

General FAQ's:

27.  What is the relationship between the attending physicians and the residents?

28.  What kind of residents are you looking for?

29.  Do you accept residents with prior training?

30.  I don't know Spanish. Will this make me less competitive? Will I be able to work in the ED without frustration or difficulty?

31.  What are lab and x-ray turnaround times?

32.  Do I need to do a rotation at KRMC to be competitive in the match?

33.   Am I at a disadvantage in a matching at KRMC if I am not from the Western United States?

 

Application FAQ's:

34.  How many letters of recommendation are required?

35.  Who do the letters need to be from?

36.   Do we have any minimum board score requirements?

37.  Are both COMLEX Step One and Step Two scores required?

 

 

 

1. How is the KRMC unique amongst other emergency medicine residencies?
 
    The KRMC is a unique Emergency Medicine Residency Training Program in many ways.  We offer rotations with an exposure to the breadth of patient diversity (including socioeconomic status) and pathology, and an exposure to the variety of practice styles of the faculty.  There is ample exposure to pediatric patients, trauma patients, and patients with neurological deficits, also included are rotations offered in Las Vegas and Phoenix. >>(back to questions)
2. Is this program accredited?
    Yes. This program is fully accredited by the AOA. >>
3. Is this a 3 or 4 year program?
    The residency is a four year program. >>
4. What is the emergency department like at KRMC?
    The emergency department at KRMC is a very busy rural community emergency department (> 46,000 patients per year).  There is a high volume of sick trauma patients, as well as unstable medical patients seen in the department.  There are a variable number of medical students, interns, and residents working in the emergency department, all supervised by the emergency medicine attending staff.  The department has 35 beds, plus a lower acuity zone where patients with more minor medical complaints and minor trauma are treated at least 12 hours a day with physician assistant coverage.  There is 24 hour attending coverage in the ED and attending physicians staff all patients with the residents.    >>
5. What kind of attending coverage can be expected at KRMC?
     There is 24 hour attending coverage in our ED. In addition, there is double coverage for 84 hours a week during the busiest hours. The attending physicians primarily assist in the flow of the department, supervising patient care, teaching residents, and supervising procedures. They are readily available for resident questions. >>
6. What do the different hospitals have to offer?

  • PHOENIX CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL
    • 299-bed multi-specialty freestanding children's hospital
    • only licensed pediatric hospital in Arizona
    • 40,000 visits per year
  • SUNRISE HOSPITAL
    • largest comprehensive acute-care medical complex in Nevada
    • over 700 licensed beds
    • home of the Nevada Neurosciences Institute
    • only accredited primary stroke center
    • Level 1 trauma center
  • JOHN C LINCOLN HOSPITAL
    • 266 bed hospital
    • Level 1 trauma center
    • nation's top 2 percent of hospitals for nursing care
    • Expansion to be completed at end of 2007
    • Larger 37-bed Emergency Department and Trauma Center
  • MARICOPA MEDICAL CENTER-PHOENIX, AZ
    • 541-bed county hospital
    • burn care, pediatric and adult emergency care
    • recognized by U.S. News and World Report
    • Valley's only pediatric emergency department open 24 hours a day

    By rotating through these institutions, EM Residents are exposed to the full gamut of patient pathology and socioeconomic status.  Further, EM Residents work with a large number of Emergency Medicine Attending Physicians with varying styles of practice. >>
7. How much time in the residency is devoted to the emergency department?
    Approximately 66% of the time is spent on ED rotations. The rest of the time is spent on off-service rotations such as ICU, PICU, neurosurgery, orthopedics, radiology, neurology, anesthesia, and pre-hospital EMS services. >>
8. Are there teaching opportunities for the residents?
    The residents continually serve as teachers for the rotating students and interns on clinical shifts, as well as for fellow EM residents.  Each resident is also responsible for formal didactic presentations to the other residents.  There are lectures provided to rotating students and interns that are taught by residents and attending physicians.    >>
9. How much responsibility do residents have?
    The residents in our program have a great deal of responsibility. Patients are staffed with an emergency medicine attending.  Residents make calls to consultants, and also conduct resuscitations. >>
10. What are the specific roles of the different classes of residents?
PGY I- The first year of training concentrates on developing skills in individual patient evaluation.   Focusing on the basic principles of decision making in emergency medicine and acquiring the central knowledge base are the primary educational objectives.  The first-year residents are not primarily responsible for the care of critically ill patients.  They are expected to see a reasonable number of patients and begin to develop efficiency as they acquire familiarity with common presentations. They are expected to learn appropriate medical record keeping and documentation, basic procedural skills of wound repair, incision and drainage, burn management and splint application.
PGY2 – Residents acquire the technical skills and theoretical knowledge required as a foundation for a career in emergency medicine.  They also build on patient care skills and practical knowledge of emergency medicine. 
PGY3 – Residents refine clinical and technical skills, expanding their efficiency and multitasking abilities.  They begin to assume supervisory roles, educating other residents and students.
PGY 4 – Residents have more supervisory control of the ED at KRMC, perfecting their efficiency and multitasking abilities.  They have more autonomous role in the ED and further develop specific areas of their knowledge base with electives.  They also function as the resident in charge (RIC), and assist with the flow of the ED, and assisting other residents and students.   >>
11. What formal didactics are offered?
    The core didactic curriculum is presented Thursday mornings.  All of our residents have protected time to attend weekly teaching conference excluding those rotating on out-rotations.  Residents are freed from clinical responsibilities to attend the 6 hour teaching conference weekly.   In general, the weekly offerings consist of a mixture of Mortality and Morbidity Conference, lectures by the Emergency Medicine Residents, and faculty lectures.  In addition, there is Tumor Board, radiology conferences, EKG conferences, and Journal Clubs>>
12. Are the residents relieved of their clinical duties to attend the didactic conferences?
       All of the residents are freed from their clinical duties in the emergency department to attend the Thursday morning didactic conferences.  Residents rotating on out-rotations are not expected to be at the local weekly conferences.  However, residents on out rotations need to attend all didactics at the corresponding training site.>>
13. What research opportunities are available?
The residents are required to complete one research project during their residency at KRMC.  When completed it is expected that it is a publishable project.  All research studies are required to be approved by the IRB.>>
14. How are the residents evaluated? How often?
    Residents receive written evaluations from faculty in the ED at the end of each quarter.  These evaluations are completed by each ED core faculty physician and evaluate the resident in specific areas, such as core competencies, technical skills, clinical knowledge, responsibility and interpersonal relations.  Evaluations are accessible on a secured website that is also used to log procedures.  For all other rotations the evaluations are required monthly.   >>
15. Do the residents get to evaluate the faculty and rotations?
    Yes, the residents evaluate each attending core faculty physician quarterly and all other rotations monthly.  These evaluations are anonymous and are taken very seriously by the faculty.  >>
16. What does Kingman have to offer?
   The City of Kingman is the County seat of Mohave County located in northwest Arizona along Interstate 40 and U.S. 93. Mohave County is the fastest growing county in Arizona. Kingman elevations range from 3,300 to 3,800 feet. Our city straddles the scenic Hualapai, Cerbat and Black Mountains, which offer hiking, picnicking, camping, and other outdoor activities in the cool pines. The Kingman and Colorado River areas offer a unique range of recreational and historical attractions including several ghost towns in the area. The rivers and lakes offer fishing along with boating and other forms of water-oriented recreation. Kingman is an easy commute to Las Vegas, Laughlin, Phoenix and the Grand Canyon or a half day’s drive to Los Angeles or San Diego.


Kingman is known for being along the longest remaining preserved stretch of Historic Route 66.  Known as an all American highway, Kingman’s stretch of this historic route recently received national recognition as a National Scenic Byway. Visitors from all over the globe visit Kingman to get their “Kicks on Historic Route 66.”


Kingman is an important regional trade, service and distribution center for northwestern Arizona. Growth in U.S. trade with Canada and Mexico, combined with our City’s strategic location on national transportation routes, provides an excellent opportunity for Kingman to be a center for international trade. Major transportation modes serving Kingman include I-40, U.S. 93, two BNSF main lines, and a commercial airport offering one-day access to major southwest markets. Interstate-40 provides immediate east-west access from California to the east coast. U.S. 93 is widely known as the CANAMEX Corridor providing north-south access from Canada to Mexico.


The Hoover Dam Bypass project, located along U.S. 93, is scheduled for completion in 2008. This opens doors for communities like Kingman as an affordable alternative for a Las Vegas commuter. The price difference, coupled with the new bypass, has Las Vegas developers making land deals with property owners in Kingman, Arizona. Homes to suit any family’s needs and budget can be found throughout Kingman. Residents enjoy the area’s natural beauty and inviting climate.


Between 1990 and 2000, the city’s population increased by over 57%, from approximately 13,208 to 20,069. The city estimates its current population is 26,000+ and is expected to continue to grow at a rapid rate. The nearby surrounding cities increase the population to 40,000.  As the city continues to attract additional new residents each month and new businesses each year, a great demand for new products and services makes Kingman an ideal place for exciting new opportunities.


The US Census Bureau, in June 2003, designated the Kingman/Lake Havasu City area as a Micropolitan Statistical Area. Based on current growth, the Census Bureau estimates our area should move up to metropolitan status after the 2010 census.


Kingman’s quality housing, excellent schools including community college with extended learning through Northern Arizona University, several parks, 2 public golf courses, available land and natural resources, and the pleasant year-round weather are just a few of the positive factors that have attracted new residents and businesses to our community.


Kingman is a nice place to live! There are some restaurants, museums, a theater, parks, and mountains.  The city is an affordable place to live. The population of the Kingman 20,069 and in the immediate surrounding area is 15,431, according to the 2000 Census.  The City of Kingman occupies 30 square miles and none of it is covered with water.  The weather is hot in the summer and mild in the winter.  Most of the days are sunny, but also windy.  Monsoon season is July-August, which is when it rains a fair amount for being in the desert.  Kingman gets snow in the peaks of the Hualapai Mountains every year.  Sometimes the snow even reaches the streets of Kingman, where the elevation is approximately 3,300 feet above sea level.  Kingman is centrally located 100 miles southeast of Las Vegas, NV, 150 miles west of Flagstaff, AZ, and 180 miles northwest of Phoenix, AZ.

Kingman, Arizona average temperatures

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Kingman, Arizona clear and cloudy days

 

 

 

  >>
17. Do you get a chance to see the rest of Arizona?
    Yes. It is only a short drive away to magnificent hiking, mountain biking, rock climbing, and camping.  The Grand Canyon is only 200 miles away.   As a resident, you will have ample opportunity to pursue the activities you enjoy. >>
18. How is the Residency Program governed?
  The KRMC EM residency is a single integrated program directed by a program director whom reports to the Kingman Regional Medical Center Graduate Medical Education Committee.  >>
19. Who would do well at the KRMC?
    This is a residency program that demands much of the residents, including self-reliance, independence, responsibility, and hard work.  Residents are not led by the hand, nor are they held back.  They are encouraged, supported, and guided.  All of the tools are available in the residency to allow residents to mature into superior practitioners and leaders of emergency medicine in any arena.  In order to make the most of this experience, a resident should be highly motivated, focused, energetic, enthusiastic and willing to get involved in everything that is offered. >>
20. How are applicants selected?
   Each application is reviewed by several of the staff in specific areas: Grade Point Average, the Dean's Letter, the letters of recommendation, the COMLEX Step 1 Score and Step 2 averaged (if completed), the personal statement, and outside activities.  Then some applicants are invited to interview.  Each applicant will interview with several of the staff.  The final rank order list is created based on the application score, and the interviewee’s average score. >>
21. Does the date that I interview affect my position on the residency's Rank Order List? Should I plan to interview only in January, for example?
    Absolutely not!  There is NO CORRELATION between the date that an applicant interviews at our program and their position on the rank order list. The importance of interviewing in January is a myth.  >>
22.  Have there been any recent changes in the program? 
    Yes.  We are constantly improving the program wherever we can.  Recent affiliation agreements have been established to strength and improve the quality of the out-rotations.  >>
23.  What is the future of the Kingman Regional Medical Center Residency in Emergency Medicine?
   The future of this residency program is brighter than ever.  We have some of the most talented emergency medicine residents, very dedicated faculty, and an unmatched breadth of training environments within a single program. >>
24. Where should I write to request a brochure or additional information?
    All of the information that is available is posted on the pages of this web site. We do not publish a written brochure. Requests for information will be referred back to the web site.  >>
25. Do you accept USMLE scores?
    COMLEX scores are required as this is an osteopathic training program.   USMLE scores can always be included. >>
26. Do you have a resident mentoring program?
    Yes.  Each EM Resident is assigned to a faculty member for formal mentoring sessions. These assignments are made randomly. >>

General FAQ's:

27. What is the relationship between the attending physicians and the residents?  Attending and resident physicians all come from diverse geographic, social, and medical training environments. This leads to an invigorating cross-pollination of ideas and values.
 28. What kind of residents are you looking for? We are looking for physicians who are willing to work hard, and want to learn emergency medicine in a supportive environment.  We are looking for no specific character type.  By virtue of being granted an interview, you have met any academic criteria that we may require.  Following that, it is for both of us to determine if you would like to work with us for three years, and vice-versa.
 29.  Do you accept residents with prior training? Yes.  The Traditional Rotating internship counts as a year of training.  With the change in the AOA from Traditional Rotating internships to tracked internships, applicants will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
 30.  I don't know Spanish. Will this make me less competitive? Will I be able to work in the ED without frustration or difficulty?  Not knowing Spanish will have no bearing on your competitiveness in our program.  In fact, only a few of our 12 residents are fully fluent.  Not knowing the language will not be a hindrance, since we have translators available, and a 24 hour translator phone. 
 31.  What are lab and x-ray turnaround times?   The health care system has a PACS (digitized) radiography system with monitors for reviewing films in the ED. Lab turnaround times are about one hour for the usual studies. As a resident you are not responsible for lab draws, transport, starting IV's, or blood gases (unless you feel you need the experience).
32.  Do I need to be an intern or do a rotation at Kingman Regional Medical Center to be competitive in the match? No. Of the four members entering 2004, two were interns with us. Of the four entering the residency in 2005, one was an intern with us, and one came from a different specialty program.  Of the four members entering in 2006, all were interns here, but not all did a medical school rotation here.  All candidates who are interested are encouraged to apply.  It often helps to a face to go with the application, so rotations are encouraged, but are not mandatory.
 33.  Am I at a disadvantage in a matching at KRMC if I am not from the Western United States? Definitely not!  Reviewing the medical schools of our current residents will also show that they come from everywhere.  We are looking for the best possible people, regardless of from where they may originate. We have residents from Alaska to the East coast.

Application FAQ's:

34.  How many letters of recommendation are required? We require three letters. 
 35.  Who do the letters need to be from? The letter should be from clinical preceptors or faculty and should be from within the past one year. 
 36.  Do we have any minimum board score requirements? We do not consider applicants who have not passed their boards (i.e., COMLEX). Otherwise, there are no requirements.  We do not set a minimum score. This is one piece of data that is considered in sum with the entire application
  37.  Are both Step One and Step Two scores required? Having both scores is very helpful, but not essential.

 
td>   Kingman Emergency Medicine.com is wholey owned and operated by the Kingmane Emergency Medicine Residency. All rights reserved. Information and pictures may not be used without written consent. Last updated February 27, 2009